• Slavery: The condition in which one person is owned as property by another and is under the owner’s control, especially in involuntary servitude.
  • Transatlantic slave trade: The selling of Africans as slaves across the Atlantic Ocean between Europe and the Americas.
  • Triangular trade: The name often given to the transatlantic slave trade and that describes the three sides to the route the slave ships took from Europe to West Africa, then to the Caribbean and the Americas and finally back to Europe. These routes are known as the Outward Passage, the Middle Passage, and the Return or Homeward Passage.
  • Outward passage: This refers to the first stage in the transatlantic slave trade. Ships carrying goods were sent to the West African coast to trade for captured Africans.
  • Middle passage: The second stage in the Transatlantic Slave Trade, in which ships carried enslaved Africans from Africa to either the Caribbean islands or the Americas.
  • Homeward passage: The third stage in the Transatlantic Slave Trade, with ships carrying items grown or made in the Caribbean or the Americas, such as sugar or tobacco, to Europe to sell.
  • Abolitionist: A person who supported the movement to end the Transatlantic Slave Trade and slavery.
  • William Wilberforce: British politician. As a member of Parliament (1780-1825) he successfully led the campaign for the Slave Trade Act (1807), which abolished the slave trade in the British Empire.
  • Thomas Clarkson: Thomas Clarkson was a key campaigner for the abolition of the slave trade and gathered evidence and witnesses for the cause, particularly from sailors. This evidence was used in Parliamentary enquiries to highlight the inhumanity of the slave trade and slavery.
  • The Slave Trade Act: The 1807 act was a comprehensive attempt to close the slave trade. By passing the law in March, Congress gave all slave traders nine months to close down their operations in the United States.

Anuncios